PAULINE BOTY: POP ARTIST & WOMAN

The artist at work Pic: Derek Marlowe The artist at work Pic: Derek Marlowe

Pauline Boty was a leading figure in the Pop Art movement of the 1960s until her untimely death aged just 28. A friend and contemporary of Peter Blake, Derek Boshier and David Hockney, Pauline Boty was one of the few female artists associated with the movement yet her work, which explores themes of female sexuality, gender, race and politics, has been largely overshadowed by her male Pop Art counterparts.

The Only Blonde in the World 1963 The Only Blonde in the World 1963

One look at the photos of Pauline Boty and you are confronted with a woman, a painter, who stylistically embodied the boundary busting ethos of swinging Sixties London. According to fellow painter Peter Blake she was the first woman in London to wear men’s 501s – “I used to say, ‘Pauline, your flies are undone.’ It was a reasonably funny thing to say to a woman in…

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Meet Maggie. She makes her own clothes.

Little Stories

During my recent foray into wardrobe minimalism and a general engagement on the philosophy of what to wear and where to find it, I’ve been thinking a lot about buying well-made clothes. And well made in two senses: made with a high degree quality and made in an ethical and socially responsible way. I’d love to jump off the fast fashion train entirely, but let me tell you, it is hard to find affordable, ethically made garments. If you get tired of searching, you could be like my friend Maggie, who just makes her own clothes.

Yes! She makes her own clothes. Even though I was homeschooled, I cannot even imagine attempting the same. But I find her endeavor so inspiring, and I wanted to sit down with her and talk about her lifestyle of dressing herself in handmade garments.

Interview with Maggie Stein, Who Makes Her Own…

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How To View Critics Telling You How to View Art in a Museum

Thinking about museums

The blind fingerless art critic by Flickr user Shareheads CC-BY 2.0 The blind fingerless art critic
by Flickr user Shareheads
CC-BY 2.0

I have a confession to make: art critics baffle me. Especially when they venture to make grand pronouncements about the right way to go about experiencing art in museums. So when I saw the title of Philip Kennicott’s piece in the Washington Post, titled “How to view art: Be dead serious about it, but don’t expect too much” I will confess that I died a little bit inside. “Sigh. Another ‘you people are doing it all wrong’ piece.” Just what the world needs, another art critic holding forth on the sad state of museums and museumgoing. But, though there is plenty of sneering, there’s also a lot worthy of discussion. And debate. Kennicott’s post didn’t stand alone too long before Jillian Steinhauer posted a reply at Hyperallergic, and Jen Olencziak a rebuttal at Huffington Post. So, let’s take a…

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Baudelaire and procrastination: the flâneur, the dandy, and the poet

very good read, although i keep putting it off

Procrastination: Cultural Explorations

The following is a guest blog by Tamara Spitzer-Hobeika, one of our speakers in this autumn’s Procrastination Seminar. Come and hear Tamara discuss ‘Baudelaire’s dandy: the anti-procrastinator’ on Wednesday 29 October at 5.30pm in the Old Library, All Souls College, Oxford.

baudelaire 1855 Baudelaire, by the famous photographer and balloonist Nadar (aka Gaspard-Félix Tournachon), 1855-8

Il n’y a de long ouvrage que celui qu’on n’ose pas commencer. Il devient cauchemar.

The only difficult work is that which we dare not begin. It becomes a nightmare.*

—Charles Baudelaire

These words by the accursed poet, the writer of beautiful spleen and terrifying idéal himself, are a perfect mantra for anyone experiencing the entrancing throes of procrastination.

The sentence that follows them in his Journaux Intimes (1887)—“By putting off what one has to do, one runs the danger of never being able to do it”—confirms that Baudelaire was no stranger to procrastination. Since…

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Ghost Story by Stephen

Very touching and clever Stephen. x

The Photograph Collective

We thought we’d go to the beach. We thought we’d go the park. We thought we’d stay in and watch a movie. I wasn’t there. I was there to watch. The tears in the wallpaper. The tears ripping through our home. “Lost in Translation”? “Veto”. “Brighton”? “Veto”. (We) crossed the landing. I followed silently.

Image 1-2Image 2-2

I left. I went to the park. I escaped. I’m alone now. She’s alone now. It’s okay though. I will be there by her side. Alone. While she sleeps. She’ll find someone. Somewhere. She will be loved. They will be happy. They will go to the beach. They will watch a film. “Brighton”? “Ok”! “Lost in Translation”? “Great”!

Image 3-2

I will hold guardian. I will let go. I will travel to my places. Exploring what there is left to be explored. I will wander silently. I will.

Stephen

turnockstephen.wordpress.com


Critiques

Aaron: I love what you’ve written, the…

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